Why doesn’t Japan take child abduction seriously?

” alt=”Why doesn’t Japan take child abduction seriously?” />
Getty images
Text settings

Comments

It’s not often that Japanese affairs get a mention in the EU, still less a condemnatory one. But that’s what happened last week when the EU petitions committee unanimously passed a motion censoring the Japanese government for failure to conform to international norms, and comply with international law, over the question of parental child abduction.

The issue, provoked by a history of cases where Japanese nationals (nearly always the mother) remove their children and subsequently deny access to their estranged foreign national father, has long been festering. It has been raised by the French and Italian presidents, and the British ambassador in the recent past, though with few tangible results. This latest rebuke, from an EU that has long had a cosy relationship with Japan, marks a significant escalation.

Earlier in the year the petitions committee heard impassioned testimony from Frenchman Vincent Fichot and Italian Tommaso Perina who had both lost contact with their children after abductions. Fichot described the treatment he had received at the hands of the Japanese authorities as uninterested, even hostile. High-profile British cases like Shane Clarke, who lost his two daughters in 2008, or Paul Halton, who lost three children in 2004, and numerous others, have expressed similar sentiments.

Despite being a party to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, Japan is accused of never having taken its obligations seriously. Fichot exemplified this by citing a comment from the Japanese ambassador to the UN declaring that to celebrate the 25th anniversary of signing the convention Japan would commit to fully honouring its commitments. This was followed the very next day by a judge in Tokyo ruling that the convention had no binding power. ‘They are laughing in our faces’, said Fichot.

Along with the UNCRC, Japan in 2014, after intense criticism, finally become party to the Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction, which sought to ensure the prompt return of children (thirty years after the UK). But this too was met with scepticism, particularly as the implementing legislation contained loopholes, such as exceptions when accusations of abuse were made (always believed and seldom followed up).

Quite why Japan seems so reluctant to fall into line on this issue is a matter of heated conjecture. Accusations of institutionalised racism abound. Jeremy Morley, a lawyer specialising in child abduction cases, put it like this:

‘A Japanese court will never give custody to a foreign parent. They will feel it would be extremely unfair to a child to deprive him of the opportunity to live in a wonderful place like Japan.’

But as the EU’s Patrizia de Luca said, most victims of abduction cases are Japanese nationals, and the attitudes that inform official responses to such cases, wherever the fathers come from, are deep-rooted and culturally specific.

Japanese men do not traditionally play much of a role in childcare, and as a result, the Japanese do not value the idea of joint custody as highly as in the west. Unlike in the UK, the concept has no legal personality, and it is common for divorced couples to agree that the mother will take sole care of the children with the father removed from the picture entirely.

A striking example of this is former prime minister Junichiro Koizumi, who has three children, the youngest of whom he has never met, despite their once living within walking distance of each other. Koizumi’s wife, pregnant at the time of their divorce, agreed that it was simpler and easier for the mother to take sole control of the as yet unborn child. The boy grew up idolising the parent he never knew, reportedly sticking his poster on his bedroom wall. Once, intending to finally speak to his famous father, he got within touching distance at a political rally, before losing his nerve and drifting away.

Divorce too, though on the rise with one in three Japanese marriages breaking up, has a cultural dimension, a stigma that precludes much official sympathy; and family problems in general are not seen as the business of the state. There is a lingering ‘none of our business, sort it out yourselves’ attitude – that recalls the old ‘It’s a domestic – leave it’ approach once favoured by the British police. The authorities emphatically do not see themselves as social workers. Child abduction by a parent is typically not even considered a crime unless violence is involved.

But the EU’s intervention, the strongest signal to date of international opprobrium, will either finally yield concrete results for some deeply wounded individuals from what can seem like an uncaring and ossified system; or provide yet more evidence of the difficulties lone individuals face against entrenched power structures, and the hollowness of the wording of grand international agreements. Will Japan finally take child abduction seriously?

Written byPhilip Patrick

Philip Patrick is a lecturer at a Tokyo university and contributing writer at the Japan Times

翻訳は以下

https://note.com/20130919/n/nd438b8ff34b6

TheSpectator フィリップ・パトリックさん記事
なぜ日本は子供の誘拐を真剣に考えないのか?

日本の問題がEUで言及されることは滅多にないし、それでも非難されることは少ない。しかし、先週のEU請願委員会では、親の子の奪取問題をめぐって、国際的な規範に従わず、国際法を遵守しなかったとして日本政府を検閲する動議が全会一致で可決された。

この問題は、日本人(ほとんどが母親)が子供を連れ去り、その後、別居している外国人の父親との面会を拒否してきた歴史に端を発しており、長い間悪化の一途をたどってきた。フランスやイタリアの大統領や英国の大使なども最近になってこの問題を提起しているが、具体的な結果はほとんど出ていない。日本と長い間友好的な関係を築いてきたEUからの今回の非難は、大幅なエスカレーションを示している。

今年の初め、請願委員会は、フランス人のヴァンサン・フィショさんとイタリア人のトンマソ・ペリーナさんの熱のこもった証言を聞いた。フィショーさんは、日本政府の対応について「無関心で、敵対的でさえある」と語った。年に2人の娘を失ったシェーン・クラークさんや、2004年に3人の子供を失ったポール・ハルトンさんなど、イギリスの有名な事例も同様の感情を表明しています。

日本は国連児童の権利条約の締約国であるにもかかわらず、その義務を真剣に受け止めてこなかったと非難されている。フィショー氏は、国連の日本大使のコメントを引用してこのことを例証した。翌日、東京の裁判官は条約に拘束力はないとの判決を下した。彼らは私たちの顔を見て笑っている」とフィチョット氏は言う。

UNCRCとともに、日本は激しい批判の末、2014年についに国際的な子の奪取の民事面に関するハーグ条約に加盟した(英国から30年後)。しかし、これもまた懐疑的な見方を受けた。特に、実施法案には、虐待の告発があった場合の例外(常に信じられていたが、ほとんどフォローアップされなかった)などの抜け穴があったためである。

なぜ日本がこの問題で一線を画すことに消極的なのか、それは激しい憶測の問題である。制度化された人種差別だという非難が飛び交っている。拉致問題を専門とする弁護士のジェレミー・モーリー氏はこう言う。

日本の裁判所は外国人の親に親権を与えることはありません。日本のような素晴らしい場所で生活する機会を奪うことは子供にとって非常に不公平だと感じるでしょう。

しかし、EUのパトリツィア・デ・ルカ氏が言うように、拉致被害者の多くは日本人であり、父親の出身地がどこであろうと、このようなケースに対する公式の対応に情報を提供する態度は、根深く、文化的に特殊なものである。

日本の男性は伝統的に育児にあまり関与しないため、日本人は共同親権という概念を欧米ほど重視していない。英国とは異なり、この概念には法的な人格がなく、離婚した夫婦が、父親を完全に排除して母親が単独で子供の世話をすることに合意するのが一般的です。

その顕著な例が、小泉純一郎元首相である。彼には、徒歩圏内に住んでいたにもかかわらず、会ったことのない末っ子が3人いる。離婚時に妊娠していた小泉氏の妻は、まだ生まれてもいない子供を母親が独占した方が単純で楽だと同意していた。少年は知らない親に憧れて育ち、寝室の壁にポスターを貼っていたと言われています。一度、有名な父親と最後に話そうと思っていた彼は、政治集会で触れ合える距離まで近づいたが、勇気を失って漂流してしまったことがあった。

離婚も増加傾向にあるが、日本では3組に1組が離婚するという文化的な側面がある。また、家族の問題は一般的に国家の仕事とは見なされていない。「私たちには関係ない、自分たちで解決しよう」という態度が長引いている。当局は、強調的に自分たちをソーシャルワーカーとして見ていない。親による子供の誘拐は、暴力が関与していない限り、通常、犯罪とさえ考えられていない。

しかし、EUの介入は、これまでの国際的な反感を示す最も強力なシグナルであり、無関心で骨抜きにされたように見えるシステムから、深く傷ついた個人のために最終的に具体的な結果をもたらすか、あるいは、定着した権力構造や大規模な国際協定の文言のお粗末さに対して、一人の個人が直面する困難さを、さらに多くの証拠を提供することになるであろう。日本はついに拉致問題に真剣に取り組むようになるのだろうか。

DeepL翻訳使用

ーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーーー

日本政府の対応について「無関心で、敵対的でさえある」と言う言葉は日本に住むものとして非常に胸が痛みます。私はここに出てくる外国人当事者たちを知っています。書いてあることは真実です、だからこそ悲しい。

一例として小泉純一郎元首相の話が触れられている事に驚きましたが、ここに書かれている内容が真実なのかは私には解りかねます。

欧州請願委員会が全会一致で可決された事や海外での報道に日本政府がどのような対応をするのかが非常に気になるところです。

2週間前